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    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Chlorosan

    The Chlorosan is enhanced with chlorine-specific wetting and penetrating agents which ensure that the mould spores embedded in porous surfaces are effectively eliminated. This is what makes it different to regular chlorine bleach and is the secret in limiting mould regrowth.
    The Chlorosan is a thickened product and can be used neat or diluted up to 1 in 10 for mould treatment.

    Key Positives

    • Low cost & very effective – virtually fail-safe results
    • Total elimination of mould stains & total kill of mould spores
    • The product of choice for outdoor mould.

    Negatives

    • Contains chlorine – Chlorosan is based on 6% chlorine (Sodium Hypochlorite).

    Percide

    Percide is a potentiated hydrogen peroxide based product and is supplied in a ready to use form. The advantage of the Percide is that there is no chlorine vapours, which some people find harmful. It also fizzes when in contact with mould which acts as an indicator for mould growth and is excellent for customer demonstration.

    Key Positives

    • Very effective – virtually fail-safe results
    • Total elimination of mould stains
    • Total kill of mould spores

    Negatives

    • Doesn’t work as well as Chlorosan for mould on outdoor surfaces
    • Will mark polished marble and natural stone.

    Biosan

    Biosan is a potentiated Benzylkonium chloride product and is supplied as a concentrate. It is very safe in use and is absolutely lethal to mould spores. However, it does not remove the staining unless left to dwell overnight.

    Key Positives

    • Very low cost. 1:16 dilution ratio.
    • Very safe in use.
    • Total elimination of mould stains
    • Total kill of mould spores

    Negatives

    • Doesn’t remove mould staining

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    To effectively clean and sanitise a mattress follow these steps:

    1. Prespray with Biosan II at 1:40
    2. Allow 20 minutes reaction time.
    3. Extract with Rinse Pro or Extracta Pro
    4. If there is still staining apply Spotaway U, brush in and leave. (it may take a couple of hours for the staining to fade).

    Note: If a faster reaction is required to remove staining, you can allow 20minutes reaction time and then extract again with Extracta Pro or Emulsifier Plus.

    Download our Fact Sheet: Cleaning & Sanitising Mattresses

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Actichem is currently stocked in New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania and the ACT. To view your closest stockist download our comprehensive list below.

    Actichem 2018 List of Stockists

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    One of the only things that takes Iodine stains out of vinyl, is Oxyboost Plus (Containing Sodium Percarbonate). It will also remove many other stains such as nicotine and many colour stains caused by beverages, food, sauces and cosmetics. This also applies to these stains on marble and granite, so it is worthwhile having a few tubs of Oxyboost Plus on hand. See the below PDF on how to use Oxyboost Plus to get best results.

    Actichem – Removing Stains from Vinyl

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    What is the most effective carpet cleaning method?

    In high-traffic hospitals and health care facilities, it is important to make sure carpets are cleaned in the most effective and safe ways possible. The two different methods of cleaning carpets are outlined below, they both have distinct pro’s and con’s and are best used in combination.

    Encapsulation cleaning system:

    Encapsulation cleaning eliminates the requirement for a wet extraction rinse when cleaning carpets and upholstery. To achieve this, the encapsulation cleaning solution contains specialty, brittle dry-down polymers. A professionally formulated encapsulator will emulsify the oily soil particles and dry down to a totally dry, brittle structure which will not attract other soils and be easily released to vacuuming. The Actichem Encap Plus & Perox combination, provides the additional benefit of containing a high activity Hydrogen Peroxide which effectively destroys bacteria, viruses and other germs.

    These interim cleaning encapsulator products are normally diluted 1:32 with water and spray applied to the carpet or fed through a solution tank. The solution is then worked into the carpet with a rotating brush or pad. After thorough agitation, the area is allowed to dry (30 – 40 minutes) after which time the area can be re-opened to traffic.

    After 24 hours the encapsulator will be cured and the encapsulated soil will be dry and brittle. The area can now be vacuumed to remove the encapsulated soil. This system is ideal for high-use areas and is significantly easier, quicker and less equipment-intensive than hot water extraction.

    It is important to note that these products are designed for interim cleaning. Because you do not have the advantage of the flushing action of hot water extraction where high quantities of soil can be removed, these products are to be used within a cleaning program where hot water extraction is periodically used to deep clean the carpet. Hot water extraction is also needed if the application of a carpet protector is required.

    What is the most effective carpet cleaning method?

    Hot water extraction cleaning:

    The hot water extraction (steam) cleaning process involves spraying a detergent and Hydrogen Peroxide combination onto the carpet to destroy germs, emulsify and release soils. The carpet is then sprayed with high temperature water and rinse solution while simultaneously being extracted with a carpet extraction machine. The distinct benefits of this method of cleaning are that the carpet is left sanitized, clean and entirely free of soiling. The major consideration to make however, is that this process takes longer and drying times are longer. It is recommended that this process be used in conjunction with an encapsulation cleaning regime.     

    How often should the carpets in health care facilities be cleaned?

    Benjamin Franklin’s famous adage “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” holds true for carpet maintenance as well. Carpets can trap pounds of dust and other unwanted allergens, but they need to be cleaned regularly to avoid wear and tear and to keep them fresh so they can serve their valuable role as air filters. As a rule of thumb, if you begin to see soil collecting in the traffic lanes, you’ve waited too long. Using the correct steps to prevent carpet damage is not only the safe thing to do for residents and patients, but also is more economical. Regular carpet cleaning will be far less expensive than carpet replacement.

    At minimum, carpets should be professionally deep cleaned and sanitized with a hot water extraction process every six months. Interval cleaning using encapsulation methods should be conducted every two months. All carpet should be on a regular maintenance schedule. Additionally, areas with heavier traffic, such as entryways and hallways, should be cleaned more frequently.

    Minimizing damage and extending carpet life

    The most important maintenance step for carpet longevity is frequent cleaning. This involves three steps:

    • Regular and thorough vacuuming. Use a commercial grade vacuum with an adjustable beater bar/brush and a microfiltration system. Good vacuums are well worth the investment. Depending on traffic levels, vacuuming should be done several times a week, especially in high-traffic areas. Typically, bag-style vacuums work best and the bags should be disposed of when they are two-thirds full.
    • Spot cleaning/surface cleaning: Spills and spots are bound to happen. Typically, the sooner you treat the spot, the easier it is to remove. When spots occur, clean them up quickly using Conquer O2. The best initial treatment is simply spray the spot with an encapsulating spotter and blot up a new spill or spot with a clean, white cloth to remove excess fluids and prevent them from penetrating deeper into the carpet fibers.

    Making sure your medical facility has safe and clean floors is essential to providing the best customer service and creating a healthier living and working environment. With these techniques, not only will you ensure that your medical residence is as clean as can be, but you will also be protecting your flooring investment and providing your residents and patients with a safer, healthier, more pleasant experience.

    Related articles:

    Part 1: Are carpets in medical facilities making us sick?
    Part 2: How should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities?
    Part 3: How often should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities to reduce the spread of infection?

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    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    The Actichem Chemical Dilution Guide is an excellent resource for busy contractors. Quickly and accurately calculate mixing proportions with this easy to read chart. Download it here or comment below to request a laminated copy to be sent directly to you.

    View Here.

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    How often should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities to reduce the spread of infection?

    How often should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities?

    According to government health regulations and recommendations, floor surfaces in healthcare, should be cleaned and disinfected once a day, spills should be cleaned up immediately and the area disinfected. However, the regulations for carpets state that, carpets in public areas and in general patient-care areas should be vacuumed daily with well-maintained equipment, fitted with HEPA filters to minimise dust dispersion. After a spill has been removed as much as possible, the carpet should be cleaned using a hot water extraction method, which is recognised by AS/NZS 3733:1995 to minimise chemical and soil residue.
    Carpets should undergo thorough cleaning on a regular basis as set by facility policy, using a method that minimises the production of aerosols, leaves little or no residue and is recommended by Australian Standards and manufacturers recommendations.

    The healthcare industry has specifically left this recommendation quite vague, due to the absence of reliable technology for efficiently and effectively, cleaning and sanitising carpets on a regular basis. Carpets and soft furnishings in hospitals and other healthcare institutions, are used in non-critical patient-care areas and public spaces. This eliminates the requirement for daily cleaning of these surfaces.

    Carpets in healthcare facilities should be cleaned once per month at a minimum, to ensure that the possibility of fungal and bacterial growth is kept under control. Combining a regular cleaning schedule with potentiated Peroxide solutions, will also ensure the appearance and integrity of the carpet is maintained, and will ensure that soiling in the carpet does not contribute to noxious odours throughout the facility. Actichem’s Potentiated Peroxide systems will also dramatically inhibit the prolific increase in bacteria counts. One of the most significant advantages of the Actichem Peroxide System, is that while sanitising surfaces, it does not contribute to the formation of resistant bacterial strains.

    While every facility is different, a sample cleaning program is covered later in this article. Facilities can utilise this system outlined here, by purchasing their own equipment and training staff to carry out the works, or, implement the system as a recommendation to the contract cleaning company.

    Actichem Carpet In Medical Facilities Part3

    Hospital Carpet Cleaning Schedule

    Daily: Carpets vacuumed using a quality equipment which includes an approved HEPA filter.
    Spills are cleaned up using Actichem Conquer O2. Conquer O2 incorporates potentiated Peroxide as well as encapsulation technology. This will remove soiling, remove the stain and sanitize the affected area. (Meets and exceeds requirements for Hospital Grade Disinfectants – Tested to TGA testing approved).

    Once per month: Carpets should be cleaned using an encapsulation system carpet cleaning machine, in conjunction with the Actichem Encap Plus and the potentiated peroxide system. This will clean and sanitize the area, quickly and efficiently. (Meets and exceeds requirements for Hospital Grade Disinfectants – Tested to TGA testing approved).

    Once per quarter: Carpets should be cleaned using a hot water extraction method, which is recognized to minimise chemical and soil residue. This cleaning process should be undertaken using the Actichem Performance Plus and the potentiated peroxide system. This will clean and sanitize the area, quickly and efficiently. (Meets and exceeds requirements for Hospital Grade Disinfectants – Tested to TGA testing approved).

    Having a clearly defined strategy for maintaining the carpets in healthcare facilities, is an important step in limiting the possibility of hospital acquired infections (HAI) spreading. This also maintains the carpets ability to trap dirt and germs before they make their way into critical areas.

    Related articles:

    Part 1: Are carpets in medical facilities making us sick?
    Part 2: How should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities?

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    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    How should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities to reduce the spread of infection?

    The search for an effective carpet cleaning program, starts here

    In hospitals and health care facilities, it is important to make sure carpets are cleaned safely and effectively. The most important first step, is to consult a carpet care specialist. Our team at Actichem specializes in providing detailed, easy-to-use programs, to assist you in achieving the best possible result from your carpet cleaning regime. There are many factors to consider, including the type of carpet, the location and the methods required to achieve proper sanitization and cleaning.

    Achieving the best possible result, typically involves a two-sided approach, regular cleaning, and deep cleaning. Regular cleaning is typically conducted using an encapsulation method and can be carried out by trained hospital staff. Encapsulation cleaning eliminates the requirement for a wet extraction rinse when cleaning carpets and upholstery. To achieve this, the encapsulation cleaning solution contains specialty, brittle dry-down polymers. A professionally formulated encapsulator will emulsify the oily soil particles and dry down to a totally dry, brittle structure which will not attract other soils and be easily released to vacuuming. The Actichem Encap O2 provides the additional benefit of containing a high activity Hydrogen Peroxide which effectively destroys bacteria, viruses and other germs.

    How should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities to reduce the spread of infection?

    Periodic or interval cleaning should be conducted using a hot water extraction process. The hot water extraction (steam) cleaning process involves spraying a detergent and Hydrogen Peroxide combination onto the carpet to destroy germs, emulsify and release soils. The carpet is then sprayed with high temperature water and rinse solution while simultaneously being extracted with a carpet extraction machine. The distinct benefits of this method of cleaning are that the carpet is left sanitized, clean and entirely free of soiling. Some of the common questions that arise are:

    Q: Can we just stick with encapsulation cleaning without reverting to periodic hot water extraction cleans?
    A: Ultimately the answer is no. The dry vacuuming which is relied on to extract the encapsulation soil is not sufficient to release and remove all of the soiling. The nature of the fibre, yarn and carpet pile will all affect the effectiveness of this dry vacuuming. For example, dense, loop pile, wool or wool blend carpeting will trap even encapsulated, dry soiling from being released to dry vacuuming. The flushing action of the water in the periodic hot water extraction process, is the only way of removing the deep-set, stubborn soiling which contributes so significantly to premature carpet wear.

    Q: Why add interim low moisture cleaning into a cleaning program?
    A: Many commercial carpets are subjected to a large volume of foot traffic and can soil relatively fast. A large proportion of this soil type can be effectively removed using the interim encapsulation cleaning process and the restorative hot water extraction clean can be limited to every 3rd or 4th clean. The advantage of the interim encapsulation cleaning process is that it is significantly less expensive to perform in terms of labour, equipment usage and chemical costs. It allows large volume cleaning with fast cleaning rates and enables the carpet to be put back in use after only 30-60 minutes which is excellent in many commercial applications.

    Carpets work hard. Let’s give them the respect the deserve.

    Related articles:

    Part 1: Are carpets in medical facilities making us sick?
    Part 3: How often should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities?

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    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    The Actichem Spotting Chart is a super useful resource for busy contractors. Quickly identify the correct spotter for every stain. Download it here or comment below to request a laminated copy to be sent directly to you.

    View Here

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Mould Removal in Washrooms

    Part 1: Are carpets in healthcare facilities making us sick?

    It’s commonly known that carpeting is one of the most affordable and economical types of flooring on the market. What is less well-known are its various health benefits. Carpets play the role of an indoor air filter, trapping dust and other allergens as well as airborne pathogens in its fibres, preventing these elements from circulating in the air and spreading into unwanted areas. In fact, one square foot of carpeting can trap as much as a pound of dirt and dust. At the same time, carpets and soft furnishings trap germs and provide them with a safe, warm environment that contains the perfect conditions for them to breed. With patients, medical residents and nurses walking over your flooring every day, it’s imperative to implement a consistent cleaning and maintenance regimen that combines regular vacuuming with periodic professional deep cleanings, to ensure that carpeting is able to perform its role of supporting cleaner, healthier air. Infection control manuals and maintenance guides worldwide, recommend that hard floors be cleaned at least once per day! Maybe it is time we took more notice of carpets and soft furnishings, in healthcare environments.

    Carpets in medical facilities. Are they really a playground for germs?

    In actual fact, flooring is possibly the most commonly touched surface in medical facilities, and therefore a major source of HAI (Hospital Acquired Infection) transmission. Thousands of feet, wheels and equipment make contact with the floor every day. We all, often touch objects that have recently been in contact with the floor. We rest our hands on the wheels of wheelchairs, we pick up shoes, clothing and bags. Cross-contamination happens quicker and easier than we may have thought.

    Additionally, it’s good to know that the majority of dirt brought in from the outdoors, gets trapped in the carpet within the first 30 feet of the entry way. According to a University of Arizona study, nine different types of pathogens or bacteria can thrive on shoes alone and can be transferred into a home or other indoor space. Because of the role that carpets and rugs can play in trapping allergens and bacteria and preventing them from circulating in the air, placing walk-off mats at every entry point can prevent soil and other unhealthy elements from penetrating further into the facility. This approach also helps your carpets to stay cleaner and helps to maintain the longevity of your flooring.

    Flooring in healthcare facilities is often overlooked as a potential breeding ground and transfer station for healthcare associated pathogens, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), VRE, and C. difficile. Floor surfaces are considered to be non-critical, because they are not a surface that is frequently touched by the hands of patients or nursing staff (high-touch points). However, recent studies have shown germs present on flooring, are very easily transferred through bed linens, equipment and clothing, coming into contact with the floor. Researchers found that of 100 occupied rooms investigated, 41% had 1 or more high-touch objects in contact with the floor. Infection control discussions, tend to revolve around hard floor surfaces due to their prevalence in critical areas such as theatres and intensive care wards. In the study conducted by Abhishek Deshpande, MD, PhD and colleagues, researchers cultured 318 floor sites from 159 patient rooms (two sites per room) in five hospitals. The hospital rooms included both C. difficile infection (CDI) isolation rooms and non-CDI rooms. The researchers found that floors in patient rooms were often contaminated with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), VRE, and C. difficile, with C. difficile being the most frequently recovered pathogen found in both CDI isolation rooms and non-CDI rooms.

    The healthcare environment, which includes floors and medical devices, contribute to approximately 20% of the 700,000 cases of HAIs that occur each year. Innovative solutions to combat this are making infection control easier and more effective every day.

    Related articles:

    Part 2: How should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities?
    Part 3: How often should we be cleaning carpets in medical facilities?

     

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